Redefining the Music Industry – A public consultation on the future shape, needs, direction and ambitions of the music industry.

An urgent message from our man Peter Jenkinson: “UK Music has asked us to alert key operators in our network to a consultation paper preparing on the future shape, needs, direction and ambitions of the music industry.”

You can submit your thoughts and  response directly to feedback at ukmusic.org

They are closing responses by the 15th September 2009; if you need any further information go to www.ukmusic.org/consultation

Redefining the Music Industry
A public consultation on the future shape, needs, direction
and ambitions of the music industry.

Closing date for responses: 15th September 2009

About UK Music

Established in October 2008, UK Music is the umbrella body that represents the collective interest of the UK’s commercial music industry: from artists, musicians, songwriters and composers, to record labels, music managers, music publishers, collecting societies and studio producers.

Our member organisations are: the Association of Independent Music (AIM), the British Academy of Songwriters, Composers & Authors (BASCA), BPI (British Recorded Music Industry) Limited, the Music Managers Forum (MMF),
the Music Publishers Association Limited (MPA), the Musicians Union (MU), PPL (Phonographic Performance Limited) and PRS for Music.

UK Music exists to understand, explain, promote, protect and nurture the UK’s commercial music sector so that its inherent value grows and its positive knock-on effects reverberate ever further and ever deeper. UK Music, through its wide membership, has access to the very best of the talent, creativity, insight and experience of those who together make up the
commercial music sector.

Drawing on such a rich resource, UK Music is the industry unit for:

Public policy and lobbying
External awareness and public opinion
Research and analysis
Industry-relevant education and skills

For more information see www.ukmusic.org

Overview

As we all know, the music industry has been dramatically re-shaped over the past ten years. In equal measures, this has proved disruptive, challenging and exciting. It will continue to be so.

However, within a fast-changing, ever-evolving commercial market, we believe it is vital that our entire industry can pull together; that we can identify and overcome internal and external challenges, plan, strategise, set
policy and forge ahead.

UK Music is currently working on a detailed report – to be published in late October – that will seek to do just this.

In order to take into account the widest spectrum of opinion, UK Music has announced an open, industry-wide consultation that will inform this report.

Consultation Summary

Specifically, we are asking all those working within, or affected by, the music industry, to contribute their thoughts to a vision of where our commercial sector should be heading over the next 5-10 years, the challenges we need to overcome, and the changes and policies that could positively impact on both individuals and businesses.

The UK is home to the world’s most amazing musical heritage. More importantly, on the world stage we continue to punch way above our weight in terms of musical creativity, innovation and commercial success.

To ensure this remains the case, we need your help and input.

To begin with, we would ask you to respond to the following five questions:

1. What are the key challenges to growth in your particular sector? Where are the greatest opportunities for growth? What policies do you think our industry should be collectively developing to address and support these aspects, and why? Is there any role for Government to help in these areas? If so, how?

2. How can our sector offer better opportunities for young people that wish to engage with our sector? How can we best support those at the grassroots level? Can our industry create better entry avenues for those people aspiring to work within our industry and develop a career in the music business?

3. Is there a skills shortage in your sector? If so, what sort of workforce development or training would best benefit your needs? What should our industry be doing to promote further workplace equality in and throughout the sector?

4. What can industry partners – for instance, commercial radio and the BBC – do to help promote new, diverse, local musical talent across all genres?

5. Are there any other significant issues you would like to draw our attention to? (All considerations offered are welcome.) 

Download the original PDF here: PDF : Redefining the Music Industry

1 Comment

  1. When you use the phrase “labor shortage” or “skills shortage” you’re speaking in a sentence fragment. What you actually mean to say is: “There is a labor shortage at the salary level I’m willing to pay.” That statement is the correct phrase; the complete sentence and the intellectually honest statement.

    Don’t speak about shortages as though they represent some absolute, readily identifiable lack of desirable services. Price is rarely accorded its proper importance in this sort of “worker/skill shortage” rhetoric.

    If you start raising your wages and improving working conditions, and continue to do so, you’ll solve your “shortage” and will shortly have people lining up around the block to work for you even if you need to have huge piles of steaming manure hand-scooped on a blazing summer afternoon.

    Re: Shortage caused by employees retiring out of the workforce: With the majority of retirement accounts down about 50% or more, people entering retirement age are being forced to work well into their sunset years. So, you won’t be getting a worker shortage anytime soon due to retirees exiting the workforce.

    Okay, fine. Some specialized jobs require training and/or certification, again, the solution is to raise your wages and improve benefits. People will self-fund their re-education so that they can enter the industry in a work-ready state. The attractive wages, working conditions and career prospects of technology during the 1980’s and 1990’s was a prime example of people’s willingness to self-fund their own career re-education.

    There is never enough of any good or service to satisfy all wants or desires. A customer must give up something to get something. The buyer must pay the market price and forego whatever else he could have for the same price. The forces of supply and demand determine these prices — and the price of a skilled workman is no exception. The buyer can take it or leave it. However, those who choose to leave it (because of lack of funds or personal preference) must not cry shortage. The good is available at the market price. All goods and services are scarce, but scarcity and shortages are by no means synonymous. Scarcity is a regrettable and unavoidable fact.

    Shortages are purely a function of price. The only way in which a shortage has existed, or ever will exist, is in cases where the “going price” has been held below the market-clearing price. Evidence does not suggest that such is the case for the “shortages” which have recently been advanced.

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