Tag: petition

Have your say on arrangements for touring professionals and artists in the EU

Please complete and share this survey

On Monday 8 February 2021, MPs will discuss a petition relating to arrangements for touring professionals and artists in the EU and will put questions to a Government Minister.

The petition, titled ‘Seek Europe-wide Visa-free work permit for Touring professionals and Artists’, has more than 280,000 signatures as of 29 January. Please consider signing it if you haven’t already done so.

Your responses to this survey will help MPs to understand the issues musicians, artists and other touring professionals are facing and inform what questions they ask the Government. A summary of survey responses will be published on the Parliament website and shared with other MPs taking part in the session. The session will be broadcast and live streamed. What MPs say may be reported in the press and appear on the news, so please don’t share any personal information that you don’t want to be public.

Find out more about the Petitions Committee’s session on this issue

The House of Commons Petitions Committee have asked all those with an interest in these issues to share this survey. Please complete the Survey here.
They want to know about the impact of Brexit on bands and fans@HoCpetitions

Caroline Dinenage MP, Minister for Digital and Culture, will respond for the Government.

Ahead of the session, the Committee has written to the Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden MP to ask for clarity on the Government’s negotiations with the EU regarding arrangements for visa-free travel for musicians, in light of recent press reports.

The session comes as sittings in Westminster Hall, the traditional debating Chamber for e-petitions, are suspended and the Government has said it currently has no plans to enable virtual participation. The session will allow petitioners’ concerns to be debated by MPs, including those who are shielding, and will be broadcast live on Parliament TV. The Committee held two similar sessions during the closure of Westminster Hall last year, and has scheduled a further such session on a petition relating to Stamp Duty Land Tax relief for Monday 1 February.

The 90-minute virtual sessions will be open to Members from across the House, including those who are self-isolating or shielding. The sessions will be broadcast live on parliamentlive.tv and on YouTube, and a transcript of each session will be published.

Chair comments

“I’m delighted we have been able to schedule two e-petition sessions, where Members from across the House, including those self-isolating and shielding, will be able to scrutinise the Government directly on issues raised by petitioners.

“As was the case when Westminster Hall was closed due to Covid-19 last year, we have had to innovate to find ways to hold the Government to account, and crucially to voice the concerns of petitioners in the House of Commons, while our usual debates cannot be held.

“As these petitions demonstrate, there are important issues affecting hundreds of thousands of people that are being missed. Their calls for help and support must be heard.”

Petition calling on Prime Minister to stop using Licensing Act to criminalise live music

Here is the petition calling on the Prime Minister to stop using the Licensing Act to criminalise live music and to implement amendments that would exempt small gigs.

The Petition has gained well over 1000 signatures since it was launched last Monday, 27 July:

http://petitions.number10.gov.uk/livemusicevents/

We the undersigned petition the Prime Minister to stop criminalising live music with the Licensing Act, and to support amendments backed by the Culture, Media and Sport Committee, and the music industry, which would exempt most small-scale performances in schools, hospitals, restaurants and licensed premises.

If you support the petition and the ideas it represents, please sign and circulate the link above as widely as possible.

Many local authorities use the Act to bully small venues, including schools. You may even have had first hand experience of this already if you are involved with live music on a regular basis:
http://www.northamptonchron.co.uk/news/School-show-scrapped-after-head.5080776.jp

Providing musical instruments is of itself a potential offence:
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1194875/Strolling-Beethoven-Playing-PIANO-street–start-new-craze.html

Even musical instruments provided by schools are caught in this madness, as confirmed in this ‘Yes Minister’ government response of 15 July 2009 to questions raised by Lord Clement-Jones:

Lord Clement-Jones: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what information or guidance has been provided to schools and local authorities concerning the requirement to license the provision of musical instruments as “entertainment facilities” under the Licensing Act 2003 where such instruments are used in public performances of live music or private performances that seek to raise money for good causes. [HL4839]

The Minister for Communications, Technology and Broadcasting (Lord Carter of Barnes): The department has provided general advice to applicants on its website and detailed guidance to licensing authorities on the 2003 Act as it affects the provision of regulated entertainment. However, the Act has devolved responsibility for the administration of the licensing regime to individual authorities and it is for them to consider each application on its own merits. The Act does not draw a distinction between events which are put on for charity purposes and those which are not.

Although the 2003 Act requires schools and colleges to obtain a licence for regulated entertainment to which the public are invited, or for a private entertainment where a fee is charged with a view to profit, they are exempt from paying the licence fee if the event is provided by, located at and for the purpose of the school or college.

Lord Clement-Jones: To ask Her Majesty’s Government what proportion of schools in England and Wales are licensed under the Licensing Act 2003 for performances of live music and the provision of musical instruments as “entertainment facilities”. [HL4840]

Lord Carter of Barnes: We do not hold this information. The statistical data collected by the department identify how many premises have permission, in the form of a premises licence or club premises certificate, to put on regulated entertainment, including live music. However, it is not known how many schools have obtained an appropriate permission to cover live performances of music and the provision of entertainment facilities, or indeed any other form of regulated entertainment such as a dance event or a play. In some cases, a school may decide to put on an event by giving a temporary event notice.

Although the Licensing Act 2003 requires schools and colleges to obtain a licence for regulated entertainment to which the public are invited, or for a private entertainment where a fee is charged with a view to profit, they are exempt from paying the licence fee if the event is provided by, located at and for the purpose of the school or college.

See: http://www.publications.parliament.uk/pa/ld200809/ldhansrd/text/90715w0002.htm#09071576000578

Please cut and paste, or share this post if you support the petition, please sign and circulate the links above as widely as possible http://www.birminghammusicnetwork.com

You are welcome to leave any comments you may have regarding this petition below.