Category: Strategy (Page 1 of 5)

Strategy, policy, ideas, opinions and discussion of

European Tour Dates – How to cross the UK / EU Border Using a Carnet

If you are a band with European Tour Dates and are travelling in a Splitter Van with a Carnet across the UK/EU Border for the first time since Brexit, Mark at Iron Man Records explains how to keep it simple.

Mipso European Tour June 2022

I took an Americana Band called Mipso across Europe in June 2022. I learned a lot about post Brexit Border crossing. Here’s what I would recommend if you have Tour Dates to play, the UK/EU Border to cross, and a Carnet to deal with.

The first thing to do is go by Eurotunnel. Get a “passenger” ticket for a 9 seat Splitter van as it is classified as “a passenger carrying vehicle.” Don’t go on a “Freight” ticket. Avoid the Ferry, I know it’s cheaper, but the risk of huge queues and all sorts of other issues can make things complicated. I would choose a “Standard Refundable” ticket as it’s valid for a year from date of purchase, ideal if plans change, and you need to move the booking to a later date. The ticket is also refundable if something happens. Book your departure to be two hours later than needed. If you are delayed getting the Carnet processed or get stuck in Traffic you will still turn up on time. If you turn up early you can still take an earlier crossing up to two hours before your scheduled departure.

UK Outbound (export)

If you are going to choose an Inland Border Facility to present your Carnet, go to STOP 24. There are many Inland Border Facilities to choose from, I just find STOP 24 easy as it’s close to Eurotunnel. It easy to find on your way to Eurotunnel check in and easy to get to when you return. You don’t need to book in advance, you can turn up anytime you like. Stop 24 Folkestone Services is located at Junction 11 of the M20 and is the closest motorway services to the Channel Tunnel and Port of Dover. Full address: STOP 24, Folkestone Services, Junction 11, M20, Hythe CT21 4BL https://www.stop24.co.uk

Drive in and go past the petrol station. Follow the road all the way round to the back of the services where all the trucks are parked up. Using What3words Head to ///simulates.rope.weaned where there is a barrier. You will need to put your number plate in before the barrier opens. Drive all the way round until you find the van parking spaces at ///menu.oxidation.shelters. Don’t park in the truck spaces. Wear your High Vis when moving around in the truck park.

When you walk into the Services you will see the Channel Ports Office, it’s right opposite the public toilets, that’s where you need to present the Carnet.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

STOP 24 has got to be one of the worst services in the UK. Don’t have any high hopes for good food or drink of any quality. The amenities on offer are basic, but if you get stuck for hours, there are places to get hot and cold food and coffee and so on. So it’s bearable. They even have picnic tables outside. Try and stay positive.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

I use Rock-It Cargo whenever I need a Carnet. I put The Carnet in the name of Iron Man Records at the Iron Man Records address. You can list yourself and any member of the band/crew as ‘named representatives’ so any member of the travelling group can present the Carnet.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

You need to present ID with the Carnet to show you are either the holder or a named representative.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

Make sure the Green front page of the Carnet is signed and I had to then fill out a Yellow “exportation” voucher. You can do all of this in advance but you must sign the yellow voucher in front of the clerk you are handing it to. You should also have copies of your general list in case of inspection.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

Once the staff at the Customs office window have your Carnet they will ask you for a mobile phone number. They keep all your paperwork and give you a slip/receipt and you go and wait for a text. Be sure to wait where there is plenty of phone signal. Stop 24 has poor signal in some areas.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

The first time I had to visit Stop 24 I got a text after nearly 3 hours saying everything was fine and to collect the paperwork. Typically the wait might be 20 minutes, but be prepared for a longer wait on occasion. If I had been picked for inspection that would have added extra time to inspect the goods against the general list.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

Once you have the Carnet back, return to the Truck Park Exit and the barrier lifts automatically. You don’t have to pay for the parking.

When you arrive at check in for Eurotunnel, use the passenger check in, don’t get in the freight line. Here are some numbers should you want to ask about anything in advance or ask about Merch.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

EU Inbound (import)

When exiting Eurotunnel, passenger cars and vans go right. Look out for the orange sign that says SIVEP. As you follow the road out of Eurotunnel, the first slip road on the right is the one you will need to take. There is a SIVEP sign to direct you too. If you find yourself going past the Total Garage you have missed the turning and will need to use your Sat Nav to find your way.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

You can search for the Sotracom Office Calais on Bd de L’Europe, 62100 Calais, France on Google Maps. The easiest way is to use What Three Words using ///class.massive.abolish where there is a gate and a buzzer that you ring and say you have a Carnet that needs stamping as you are importing from UK to EU. Then they will let you in and you park up and walk to the office.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

Take ID & your Carnet with completed white importation voucher and copy of general list, sign it in front of them and hand it over. Then you get given a number, and you sit and wait for your number to be called and your paperwork will be ready to collect. The process took less than ten minutes and there was no inspection. There was a van driving round the car park with a bloke in a high Vis asking truck drivers questions. I timed it just right to be sure I got into the van and drove away without any further discussion. I have no idea what was going on but I didn’t want to hang around and find out. The golden rule with all of these things is return to your vehicle as quickly as possible and drive away as fast as possible before anyone decides to inspect the vehicle. But don’t make it look like you are returning to your vehicle as quickly as possible or driving away as fast as possible. Try and look relaxed. There’s no gate or buzzer on the way out, you can just drive away no problem.

EU Outbound (re-export)

You need to go somewhere different at Calais Eurotunnel on the way back to the UK to get the carnet stamped.

Follow the Eurotunnel signs to the tourist terminal at Junction 42b (Don’t get in the freight queue).

Go through Eurotunnel check in as usual.

Turn right into the passenger terminal car park as if you are going to get a coffee or visit the toilets (if you have gone through border control you have missed it!)

Walk into the terminal and turn right. Follow the signs for the Toilets. Go past WH Smith and on the left-hand side before the toilets there is a customs window (Douanes)

They process your white re-exportation voucher that you have filled in and sign in front of them etc. As mentioned before, it took 5 minutes. Keep quiet and let them process it as you stand at the window. They are no more interested in your Carnet than you are. Let them do the work while you wait.

This office is the same place that process your duty-free refunds. The staff told me they are open 24 hours, 7 days a week but there can sometimes be a slight delay if the shifts are changing over. So 5 minutes is typical but be prepared for a longer wait if they pick you for inspection or the shifts are changing over.

UK Inbound (re-import)

Return to Stop 24 as you did before. Same procedure. Park up in the van parking, hand your carnet in at the office window. You will need to get your yellow re-importation voucher stamped.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

If that’s the end of your trip you have to return the Carnet to Rock-it Cargo or whoever supplied the Carnet.

It seems to me that no one is inspecting vehicles outbound or inbound unless they have good reason to do so. Always tell the others in the travelling group to keep quiet when you are being questioned by Customs or Border Force Staff. Be sure to cooperate fully but don’t talk too much or make silly comments or jokes in case it attracts more detailed questions. Answer the questions in full as simply and clearly as possible. Get your passports stamped and get going. Don’t mess around or you may win a full inspection. And then you may be in all sorts of trouble if they find anything not listed on the carnet.

Tour Management: Crossing the UK/EU Border Using a Carnet

Useful Addresses:

UK to EU

Stop 24, Folkestone Services, Junction 11, M20, Hythe, Kent, CT21 4BL

Eurotunnel UK Terminal, Ashford Road, Folkestone, CT18 8XX

Bureau de controle douane calais port tunnel, 62100 Calais, France.

Sotracom Office Calais on Bd de L’Europe on Google Maps sotracom Office calais, 62100 Calais, France

EU to UK

Calais Eurotunnel Arrival Point, Avenue de France, 62231 Coquelles, France

Stop 24, Folkestone Services, Junction 11, M20, Hythe, Kent, CT21 4BL

Rock-it Cargo

Watch and Learn about all things Music and Brexit here: UK Europe Arts Work

For Hire: Iron Man Records Tour Management Services

Progress Report on Implementation: Destination Birmingham (Birmingham, A Music City)

Watch the video here: http://bit.ly/1egRTFX

The relevant part starts around 00:40:15

Progress Report on Implementation: Destination Birmingham (Birmingham, A Music City)

If you have an interest in Music and Birmingham you really should take the time to watch this.

Download pdf: Progress Report on Implementation Destination Birmingham – Birmingham A Music City

All positive comments invited

Subjects covered include Home of Metal, Black Sabbath, BCU and its involvement in Music, James Burkmar, UK Trade and Investment, Midem, Budget Cuts,

 

Parliamentary debate on the future of Arts, Creative & Cultural Industries and Birmingham.

Parliamentary debate on the future of Arts, Creative & Cultural Industries

The first debate in the House of Commons on arts and culture in over five years took place on 19th June 2013. Given the huge economic and cultural value the sector generates, how important to the government is the future? Maybe the clue is in the massive turn out (See picture above). Some valuable arguments were raised, including the BBC representation of regional broadcast production and investment to the Midlands. Here is the transcript or you can cringe through the video here:

If you are interested to read how some people perceive, research and formulate recommendations for the growth of the Independent Music Sector in Birmingham, read through this document: Does Birmingham punch below its weight? Research and recommendations for growth of the Independent Music Sector in Birmingham by Councillor Ernie Hendricks, James Burkmar, Kevin D’Costa. It has only taken three years of emails, phone calls, and meetings to chase down and read a copy of this, but read it for yourself and draw your own conclusions.

And if you want more, to put some context around what’s been going on over the years, have a read of this, it’s an eye opener. Birmingham: How to kill a city – The Economist http://goo.gl/fb/pZgKq  – Britain’s planning laws all too often restrict and prevent investment which might create economic growth. It is worth remembering occasionally that things were once even worse. For proof of that, see this fascinating post on Birmingham’s economy in the 1950s and 1960s, by Henry Overman, of the LSE’s Spatial Economics Research Centre. It’s worth reading. A shorter version here: http://www.economist.com/blogs/blighty/2013/05/birmingham

More articles worth reading and discussing can be found here: https://birminghammusicnetwork.com/strategy/

Robin Valk at the Birmingham Music Network Meeting – 4pm Thursday 26th July 2012

Robin Valk will lead The Music Network meeting on Thursday 26th July 2012.

Robin Valk

The Meeting starts at 4pm and will finish at 5.30pm at Birmingham City University, Millennium Point, Curzon Street, Birmingham, B4 7XG.

Robin is a broadcast and software consultant. He has been in radio for over 40 years, working on student radio, US Rock Radio, Commercial Radio and BBC Radio 2. When not consulting, teaching, podcasting or writing on radio and music, Robin works on radio and music projects – most recently, a documentary project on the music and musicians of Handsworth, Birmingham, and he’s leading the Pilot Project for the British Library.

Robin is one of the most experienced music programmers in Europe, working for RCS, makers of Selector, at their New York HQ for ten years. He offers consultancy in Selector and  P Squared’s AutoTrack / Myriad, for whom he is currently authoring online help, as well as other systems. Recent consult work has taken Robin to Southampton, Glasgow and Budapest. He is currently developing new ultra-low cost radio approaches for Internet radio streaming.

In recent months Robin has turned his attention to blogging more about local music and the stories he has uncovered.

Anyone involved in Music in the region is welcome to attend, its free and there will be tea and coffee provided. Continue reading

John Mostyn – Managing Music Workshop, Birmingham

A few words from John Mostyn who will be running the Managing Music Workshop

“In 2006 Geoff Pearce and I ran a project called Managing Music. It had European Regional Development funding and ran for 18 months. It was for managers in the music industry or self managed artists. Each applicant joined us for 6 months attending a workshop on a weekly basis with individual mentoring in between. It was a great success. It was a joy to deliver because we were able to work with some of the best up-and-coming artists and managers in the area at the time. We even had a budget to spend on recording and promotion; delightfully Geoff and I were paid for delivering the project.

Everyone who came on the project agreed that it was more than worthwhile and I suppose the ultimate accolade was when Scott Matthews won the most prestigious Ivor Novello award for his song ‘Elusive’, the recording of which was partly funded by the project as both his manager and record label were participants in Managing Music. One of the strangest aspects of European Funding is that even if something is going really well it has to end and cannot be repeated.

As I look around the ever-changing music industry scene today I am recognising that there is absolutely nothing like what we did available in the area and should an aspiring manager or self managed artist wish to seek advice or mentoring there is nowhere for them to go (please tell me if I’m wrong). There may be University courses that teach certain aspects of the music industry but who has 3 years to spare and who can afford it?

I am currently being trained to be a professional mentor and I’m starting to wonder if the time has come for me to offer my skills and experience via paid one-to-one mentoring. Although the industry is changing so quickly there is still a lot to be learned from someone who has seen it go right lots of times, and of course wonderfully wrong and from someone who frankly isn’t too bad at sharing his knowledge and experiences.

I am going to hold a free workshop on Tuesday 3rd July 2012 to take a look at how people in Birmingham’s music history have made a successful living, and how those aspiring to do that now might also be able to achieve similar successes. I will share some of my stories and I would like aspiring managers and self-managed artists to come and share with me what they feel are the gaps in their knowledge that they are facing today. This initial workshop will help direct future Managing Music seminars.

If you would like to be part of this free Managing Music workshop held at Highbury Studio, please get in touch by emailing managingmusic@gmail.com with the subject ‘Workshop’.

If you would like to be kept informed or find out more about my mentoring services, email me at managingmusic@gmail.com with the subject ‘Mentoring’.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Onwards and upwards.”John Mostyn

You are invited to the Birmingham Music Network Meeting – 4pm Thursday 31st May 2012

The Music Network meeting will be on Thursday 31st May 2012.

The Meeting starts at 4pm and will finish at 5.30pm at Birmingham City University, Millennium Point, Curzon Street, Birmingham, B4 7XG.

Anyone involved in Music in the region is welcome to attend, its free and there will be tea and coffee provided.

Birmingham Music Network 2011 Logo

The Music Network organises a NETWORKING EVENT on the last Thursday of each month, for the benefit of music related businesses in the West Midlands region. If you have any involvement in music, come and talk about what you’re up to and meet some new people. These Networking events are about all things music in the region. They’re about helping you to teach yourself how to do it, by yourself, for yourself and encourages you to share the knowledge with others so they can do the same. If you are a musician, a student, someone who works with musicians, represents musicians, has involvement with the music industry, or are looking to make new contacts…..the meeting will be useful.

If you have news to report, a presentation to give, an event to promote, any new points for discussion, a pitch to make, business cards or flyers to hand round, an appeal for help, advice or guidance or even if you just want the free tea and biscuits and some serious discussion…you are invited.

You can also post in by email any news or press release information for inclusion on the website and for distribution through the mailing list and RSS feed. More details on the website.

Please pass this invite on to Musicians you know or anyone else who you think may benefit.

Read the minutes from previous meetings here: https://birminghammusicnetwork.com/category/minutes/

Website: https://birminghammusicnetwork.com   Facebook   Twitter

Creative Networks 31st May 2012 Flyer
Creative Networks 31st May 2012 Flyer

Destination Birmingham. Birmingham A Music City Scrutiny Report

In 2010 Birmingham’s Independent Music Industry was asked to answer 10 Questions.

In May 2011 UK Music published “Destination: Music” the first study of its kind to scope the economic contribution of music festivals and major concerts to tourism throughout the UK. You can read all about it at http://www.ukmusic.org/news/post/147-music-tourists-contribute-at-least-864m-a-year-to-the-uk-economy

After May 2011 Emma Williamson (Group Overview and Scrutiny Manager) & Baseema Begum (Research & Policy Officer) at the Scrutiny Office of Birmingham City Council got in touch. Emma & Baseema sent through several documents that asked a number of interesting questions. Rather than try to answer the questions on your behalf, The Music Network decided to pass the questions on to you direct.

In October 2011 The Music Network asked Another 10 Questions.

The Music Network hope the discussion will continue. We have collected together your opinions, consultation and research here in the Strategy category.

In February 2012 An email and Scrutiny Report Document was sent to us by Baseema Begum, Research & Policy Officer, Scrutiny Office, Birmingham City Council. The email read as follows: Continue reading

« Older posts